LOG#196. Superbootstrap.

Preface (by the webpage master administrator, Amarashiki): This is the first invited post here, at TSOR. It has been written by Alejandro Rivero, a bright non-standard theoretical physicist out there (you can follow him at https://twitter.com/arivero). It has some outstanding … Continue reading

LOG#168. D-dimensional laws(III).

The question of the origin of mass is one of the more important issues in theoretical physics. The existence (or not) of extra dimensions of space and time will likely affect to the final solution of this unsolved problem. The … Continue reading

LOG#137. Unparticles.

One of the most interesting ideas of the last years between theoretical particle physicists came from conformal field theories (CFT). In their last incarnation, Georgi’s unparticles. What is an unparticle? Georgi, a very known and respected theoretical physicist, speculates about … Continue reading

LOG#116. Basic Neutrinology(I).

This new post ignites a new thread. Subject: the Science of Neutrinos. Something I usually call Neutrinology.   I am sure you will enjoy it, since I will keep it elementary (even if I discuss some more advanced topics at some … Continue reading

LOG#058. LHC: last 2012 data/bounds.

Today, 12/12/12, the following paper  arised in the arxiv http://arxiv.org/abs/1212.2339 This interesting paper reviews the last bounds about Beyond Stantard Model particles (both, fermions and bosons) for a large class of models until the end of this year, 2012. Particle … Continue reading

LOG#057. Naturalness problems.

In this short blog post, I am going to list some of the greatest “naturalness” problems in Physics. It has nothing to do with some delicious natural dishes I like, but there is a natural beauty and sweetness related to … Continue reading

LOG#047. The Askaryan effect.

I discussed and reviewed the important Cherenkov effect and radiation in the previous post, here: http://www.thespectrumofriemannium.com/?p=3276 Today we are going to study a relatively new effect ( new experimentally speaking, because it was first detected when I was an undergraduate … Continue reading